Le blog de
Javier
Caletrío

caletrío's picture

Javier
Caletrío

Profession: 
Sociologue

Braudel has been cited but rarely used in mobilities literature, yet his work places movement at the heart of social, economic and political life.

What makes a slow tourist?

9 November 2015

Slow tourism is gaining prominence as concern about climate change grows. Yet low carbon forms of tourism may be more widespread than is currently acknowledged.

Displaced lives

22 August 2015

Migration and displacement are often discussed in terms of abstract numbers. This powerful photo-essay by award winning photographer Alixandra Fazzina speaks of individual human beings in search of a secure place.

Research on ‘carbon budgets’ suggests that avoiding ‘dangerous climate change’ may require an ambitious reduction of certain forms of travel. Should this be a priority in the mobilities agenda?

Big data and the proliferation of screens may change perceptions of what the world is and the way we move through it. Could a ‘living city’ exist beyond metaphor?

The use of vision, like the other senses, has evolved alongside technological changes. How much have histories of this affected current trends, and what may this tell us about posible futures?

Piketty and mobilities

19 November 2014

Piketty’s work may open a new perspective to study the relationship between mobility and inequality, one that is more attentive to the diversity of time scales and rhythms in the creation and reproduction of wealth and the distribution of income.

The forms in which we collectively imagine social life are often reflected in, and in turn inform graphic material used for propaganda and marketing purposes. A retrospective exhibition of posters on the London Underground offered an opportunity to reflect on the shifting ways in which the changing nature of London and its transport have been conceived of.

Experienced at once as an aspiration and a burden, speed is a much contested mark of modern lives which seems to have no place in visions of sustainable futures. Art critic John Berger has written thought-provoking passages about the thrills of riding a motor bike.

Contemporary images of the future such as those associated with ‘smart cities’ overwhelmingly emphasise technology and tend to downplay the uncertainties of technological innovation. A focus on expectations can reveal the co-evolution of complex socio-technical relations.

Pages